Yet Another (ex-)VC Blog

Cloud computing, startups, and venture capital

Archive for July 2009

This is a tough objection to overcome

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3Par, a Fremont, Calif.-based maker of storage arrays for data centers, pre-announced lowered earnings for the first quarter of its fiscal year 2009 yesterday, blaming, among other things, the fact that customers don’t have access to the electricity needed to add 3Par gear to their data centers.

via Constrained Power Grids Zap Sales at 3Par.

I definitely feel bad for the 3PAR sales guys, that is a tough objection to sell around…

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Written by John Gannon

July 20, 2009 at 4:55 pm

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The Learning Test « Thinking About Thinking

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I have found that there’s a simple test for whether you are learning in your career. Look back 3–5 years from today and ask yourself if you could have been substantially more effective at your past job in your present form. If you look back a few years and feel like in comparison to who you are today, you had little idea of what you were doing and would have done things a lot differently given what you now know, that’s a telltale sign of learning and growth.

Larry Cheng of Fidelity Ventures –  The Learning Test « Thinking About Thinking.

Written by John Gannon

July 16, 2009 at 10:24 am

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Going away from the ‘dark side’ and into the startup world

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I recently decided to make a career change and at the end of the month will be leaving the world of venture capital (as some affectionately refer to as ‘The Dark Side’) for the maybe greener and definitely more uncertain pastures of the startup world.  My time at L Capital over the last year has been great, and I’ve learned an incredible amount about startups and investing, but I recently came upon an opportunity which was just too good to pass up.

I’m joining an early stage software company in the virtualization management and automation space and will be involved in all manner of customer development, biz dev, and marketing.  I’m going to work with a great team and a stellar set of investors, all who are laser focused on building a great company.  Needless to say, I am very excited about this move.

I’m not going to post details about the company publicly at this point, but will certainly do so after I have spent some time in the new job.  If you have a strong interest or background in virtualization technology and would like to discuss what we’re working on, feel free to reach out to me directly.

Thanks as always for reading, and although I’m no longer a VC at the end of the month, I hope you still keep reading!

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Written by John Gannon

July 15, 2009 at 5:15 pm

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Good follow up article on vCenter Chargeback

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Is VMware’s new vCenter Chargeback dead on arrival? At its current list price of $750 per managed processor, it may well be. Even though some VMware users understand how Chargeback could help them better utilize resources and reduce sprawl, its price tag will make it a hard sell.

“At $750 per processor, there’s no way in heck I could get management to sign off on what’s basically improved power and cooling,” said Kent Altena, infrastructure architect at Farm Bureau Life Insurance Co. (FBL) in West Des Moines, Iowa.

via Price, politics working against VMware vCenter Chargeback.

Written by John Gannon

July 15, 2009 at 12:35 pm

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One of my operating principles

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My favorite portfolio CEO quote of the day – “Pleasant persistence overcomes resistance.”

via Joe Medved (joevc) on Twitter.

Written by John Gannon

July 14, 2009 at 12:22 pm

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Why isn’t VMware giving away chargeback for free?

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337/365: The Big Money
Image by DavidDMuir via Flickr

VMware announced GA for a bunch of products today, including the vCenter chargeback package.

I’m a little surprised that they have not priced it lower, or decided to give it away for free.

Most enterprise IT shops talk a good game about doing chargeback, but they rarely do implement, and if they do, its typically implemented on a very limited scale.

Better cost transparency will help VMware’s customers justify their virtualization investments while at the same time allowing internal IT make a case for why their workloads are better off running in an internal cloud versus with external cloud vendors.

Perhaps you find a way to bundle this functionality into a service provider pack (and maybe that’s who they really want to buy this stuff) but I think for typical enterprise IT shops, you go cheap or free.

Thoughts?

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Written by John Gannon

July 13, 2009 at 8:49 pm

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Networking tip for programmers – and everyone else

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Set aside one hour daily for active marketing: Software developers love to spend days and nights coding great stuff. Focusing on marketing, sales and customer activities is not quite as exciting. Put some discipline in place. A good starting point is to devote one hour per day of your time to work exclusively on marketing. And I don’t mean read the Web to learn about SEO.

Spend one full, active hour contributing to forums, pitching to people, e-mailing journalists and other key influencers that may be interested in what you do.

Does your web site have a success story from a real customer? Did you follow-up with the people you met at those meetings?

The first week, send at least two e-mails a day to people you have never met. By the third week, your goal is to receive one e-mail a day from people you don’t know. Once you figured it out, just scale.

via Good Programmers Don’t Need No Marketing « FairSoftware’s Blog.

Written by John Gannon

July 9, 2009 at 4:25 pm

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